Tuesday, October 31, 2006

 

Additional info about using eMvoy search and company rank

More about the eMvoy Score

The eMvoy Score is a new system that calculates a score for manufacturing companies by evaluating 24 different quality, reliability and stability factors. Companies are then assigned a ranking from one to five, which rates their competitive ability.

Industry professionals can use the eMvoy Score to quickly evaluate a manufacturer.

For more information, see our guide to the eMvoy Score.

What information is available on eMvoy.com?

The eMvoy Score

The eMvoy Score is used to quickly and easily evaluate manufacturing companies. Many companies are already rated with a score from one to five.

For more information, see our guide to the eMvoy Score.

Full-text searching

eMvoy.com features full-text searching. This means that our automated technology indexes the content of web sites that appear on our search results. Although we're a specialized score system and search engine for manufacturing, our technology is very robust and similar to major search engines in this respect.

You can search eMvoy.com the same way you search other search engines: by typing in your query. There are no complicated search forms or login requirements. Just type what you're looking for into the query box and click Search.

Score searching

You can use our How do they score? feature on the main page to type in a company name and find its eMvoy Score.

Editorial and Technical

eMvoy.com combines full-text searching technology with editorial know-how. In addition to the information we gather from your web site, our editors carefully choose keywords for your site, designate your company type, pick your Primary Products and ensure accuracy of our data.

The eMvoy Score is calculated based on 24 different quality, reliability and stability factors.

Company names

For most web sites, we display the company name as the clickable title in our search results. This important piece of information helps users find the companies they're looking for faster and easier.

You can also learn how to search by company name on eMvoy.

Primary Products

Our editors carefully select products and services that most closely match the main focus of companies in our system.

When you search, our ranking system automatically gives a small boost to companies that have your query terms in their Primary Products field. This helps our users find companies that specialize in a particular product or service more efficiently.

City and State

Most of the web sites in our database have a city and state information displayed in the search results. This is designed for users who find it helpful to know where a given company is located.

You can also learn how to search by city, state or zip code on eMvoy.


 

eMvoy's Big News: Coming November 1st

On Wednesday, November 1st, 2006, eMvoy will release the National State Rankings for Manufacturing Competitiveness.

The results to be released are part of the conclusions of a one year evaluation of 100,000 U.S. manufacturers. The findings include rankings of all fifty states.

Chicago-based eMvoy rated companies by assessing company stability, market penetration, technology and web presence. The research group performs large-scale evaluations of U.S. manufacturers as part of the services it provides to industrial purchasing agents.


 

More about eMvoy

About eMvoy

eMvoy is an independent technology and industry research company that provides market intelligence through in-depth analysis of US manufacturers. Utilizing comprehensive analysis backed by proprietary data, eMvoy delivers vital business information to a range of industry sectors. eMvoy is also the only service that integrates a full-text search engine with a rating system of US manufacturers.


Chicago-based eMvoy was developed by the founders of SearchEngines.com, an industry watch group. SearchEngines.com, founded seven years ago, is frequently cited as a primary source for authoritative search marketing information on search engines and has been quoted in media outlets in over 26 countries including:
?Crain’s / B2B
?CIO Magazine
?The New York Times Learning Network
?Continental Airlines In Flight Magazine
?ZD Net Australia
?Smart Business Magazine

In addition to the Chicago Sun Times and other daily US newspapers, eMvoy has also been chronicled in numerous trade publications such as:

?Automation World

?Manufacturing Business Technology

?Reliable Plant

?Modern Machine Shop

Craig Landy is the CEO of eMvoy and also directs SearchEngines.com. He launched his first internet venture in 1996. Mr. Landy has been involved in numerous other high profile Internet-related projects. Noteworthy examples include:


?An association with the BBC World Service on a panel of contributing experts for the educational series Knowledge on the Net

?Providing analysis and comprehensive statistical data for a series of articles about search engine technology published in the Wall Street Journal.

Robert Jordan, company director, is an Inc. 500 CEO. He is the founder of Online Access magazine, the first Internet-coverage magazine anywhere in the world.


 

More about "The eMvoy Score" and how we ranked the states

Introducing the eMvoy Score

eMvoy evaluated 100,000 U.S. Manufacturers over a one year period. Data was compiled from a multiple sources and specific variables were identified to measure and calculate a company's attributes relating to reliability, quality and competitiveness. The results were derived from cumulative scoring of multiple factors, each having an applied qualitative weight. Algorithms were applied to normalize the combined scores. Companies were ranked based on their final score.

Obtaining Data

eMvoy evaluated U.S. manufacturers by assessing very large, representative and geographically diverse data sets. The evaluated companies were required to have a functional website and a Standard Industry Classification (SIC) code identifying them as a manufacturer with a substantial U.S. presence. eMvoy leverages its ability to analyze data from a wide range of sources. These include:

EDIS

Many factors for evaluation were collected using our proprietary Editorially Driven Indexing Spider (EDIS). This system uses Internet based automated bots to collect massive volumes of data. The process requires rule sets that are configured by eMvoy research staff.

Third Party Data

Third-party sources were utilized. For example, databases were acquired by eMvoy that contained the lists of U.S. manufacturers that are registered to the ISO 9000 type standards. Other data was utilized from industry-specific, independent product testing and certification authorities such as NSF International.

Company-Provided Data

We request manufacturers to provide additional relevant data to help our staff validate or augment data.

Processing Data

A range of factors such as company size, company history, U.S. manufacturing facilities, ISO certifications, product or process certifications, trade association memberships, technological innovations and website content were utilized as variables. Field research was conducted to determine which factors were relevant to key decision makers. For example, industry purchasing agents were surveyed to decide which variables directly impacted procurement decisions. Weights were applied to indicate the level of importance for each factor.

What is the role of advertising in the eMvoy Score?

Advertising plays absolutely no role in the calculation of the eMvoy Score.

How do you show the eMvoy Score?

When you search our web site for services or products, you will get search results with names and a graphical representation of the eMvoy Score.

Do all industrial companies in your search results have an eMvoy Score?

eMvoy aims to rate each company in our system. Since we use numerous factors to calculate the eMvoy Score, we sometimes can't properly rank a company that doesn't have enough information available.

If you notice that your company doesn't have an eMvoy Score, we encourage you to contact us and submit more information.


 

eMvoy to rank US States by manufacturing competitiveness

On Wednesday, November 1st, 2006, eMvoy will release the National State Rankings for Manufacturing Competitiveness.

The results to be released are part of the conclusions of a one-year evaluation of 100,000 U.S. manufacturers. The findings include rankings of all fifty states.

Chicago-based eMvoy rated companies by assessing company stability, market penetration, technology and web presence. The research group performs large-scale evaluations of U.S. manufacturers as part of the services it provides to industrial purchasing agents.

eMvoy quote related to upcoming November 1st Release:

"The public perception is that, overall, U.S. manufacturing is weak. After looking at 100,000 manufacturers, we found a more complex picture. Our data pointed to a complex, yet very optimistic picture of U.S. manufacturing. A group of states scored exceptionally high for competitiveness. Other states were predictably flat or below the average. We didn't expect to see such huge gaps between the best and worst states." said Craig Landy, CEO of eMvoy.

About eMvoy

eMvoy is an independent technology and industry research company that provides market intelligence through in-depth analysis of U.S. manufacturers. Utilizing comprehensive analysis backed by proprietary data, eMvoy delivers vital business information to a range of industry sectors. eMvoy is also the only service that integrates a full-text search engine with a rating system of U.S. manufacturers. Chicago-based eMvoy was developed by the founders of SearchEngines.com, an industry watch group.

Media Contacts
Jenifer Aiello
Communications
jenifer@emvoy.com
773-665-8865 or 888-881-2255
Joseph Tucker
Public Relations
joseph@emvoy.com
773-665-8865 or 888-881-2255

You can also send reach us by sending an email to press@emvoy.com.


Monday, August 28, 2006

 

The big news at eMvoy - Introducing the first national rating system for US manufacturing

We've been working hard over the past six months to launch the eMvoy Score, the first national rating system for US manufacturing. Last Tuesday, the eMvoy Score went live at eMvoy.com.

Here's our press release:

CHICAGO -- August 24, 2006 -- eMvoy today announced the eMvoy Score™, the first national rating system for US manufacturing.

The new system, available at eMvoy.com, calculates a score for manufacturing companies by evaluating 24 different quality, reliability and stability factors. Companies are then assigned a ranking from one to five, which rates their competitive ability and their overall presence in the unsteady US manufacturing environment.

"With annual US industrial sales exceeding $1.5 trillion, the stakes are high," said Craig Landy, CEO of eMvoy. "The eMvoy Score is the essential missing piece for the vendor selection process. We condense relevant information about each company into a single icon to give our users an instant means of evaluating US manufacturers."

The number of professional purchasing agents has continued to decline, making the task of selecting reliable vendors a critical challenge for companies nationwide. "The eMvoy score is helpful at every stage of the process, especially in helping buyers narrow down a short list of potential suppliers," said Landy.

Users can search for industrial products and services and receive relevant lists of ranked manufacturers at www.eMvoy.com.

In the coming weeks, eMvoy will be releasing the Best Manufacturing States list with top ten states whose companies have earned the highest eMvoy Scores.

Craig Landy, who leads the Chicago-based team that developed the eMvoy Score, also founded SearchEngines.com, a popular online search engine resource.


You can check your company's score and search for other at www.emvoy.com



Thursday, August 24, 2006

 

Emphasis on Supplier Diversity May Help, Not Hamper, Your Bottom Line

This via IndustryWeek:

Connecting with women- and minority-owned suppliers is often perceived as a costly, administrative hassle that doesn't offer any return on investment. A recent study conducted by the Hackett Group gives this perception the lie: their research shows that top-quality procurement organizations using diverse suppliers generate $3.6 million in revenue for every $1 million spent. The companies that earned the highest returns from diverse supply connections did so by trumpeting the fact that they use diverse suppliers. Apparently the good PR appealed to consumers and investors with a sense of social responsibility, driving revenues up. Sounds like good business all around to us.

Related Links:

Monday, August 21, 2006

 

Monday Roundup: August 21

We begin the week, as always, with a look at the big-picture economy.

First, it's late August, and the various committees, finance bodies, and wonk councils that analyze trends and provide us with economic indicators are apparently just as susceptible to the dog days as the rest of us. All we'll get this week are the durable-goods orders and the July housing numbers. The housing numbers are probably not going to be great, according to the folks at MarketWatch. Experts anticipate a drop of up to 3% in new-home sales, which would bring sales to the lowest level in two years.

Couple slower housing sales with lower consumer confidence: the University of Michigan measures consumer sentiment, and its index reading for the month of August (so far) is the lowest number since right after Hurricane Katrina. Further completing the picture of consumer reluctance, the Wall Street Journal reports that "upscale" spending is finally getting pinched by higher energy costs: families with incomes as high as $75,000 a year are reporting plans to cut back on buying clothes, fashion accessories, home decor, and restaurant meals.

People are also planning to cut back on their summer vacations this year. According to the New York Times, 43% of people who responded to a Gallup poll said they had no plans to take vacations in the next six months. That is probably due as much to changing cultural trends-- anecdotal evidence suggests it's harder to leave work for more than a few days anymore-- but read the NY Times article and you will see plenty of people citing the cost of gasoline as the party pooper for their summer fun.

Speaking of the cost of gasoline, oil prices hit a two-month low last week after the Israel-Lebanon ceasefire. Also helping drop the cost of a barrel o' crude was the revised hurricane season forecast: it will be nowhere near as bad as last year's record-breaking season (which we had already been told would be the case), and won't be as bad as originally thought. Meteorologists are only expecting three major storms now, instead of five to seven.

Is the drop in oil prices the start of a trend? Since oil costs are the number one negative drag on US manufacturing at the moment, we would love to hear that oil prices are indeed expected to slide for a while.

However, whether a few days of falling prices constitutes a trend is debatable, and economy wonks love a good debate. Some would like to argue that there's actually an oil-price bubble, and that when it pops we could see oil fall back to as low as $25 a barrel. The Wall Street Journal examines the oil bubble argument here (or here at South Africa's MoneyWeb, if you don't subscribe to the WSJ). We'll encapsulate it for you if you don't have time to read up just now: analyists who buy into the bubble argument say that high crude prices have more to do with oil investment tactics than with classic supply-and-demand issues like politics, weather, or increased need for fuel.

While we wait to see who's right, we will note that oil prices rose slightly today in international trading, largely because Iran tested some short-range missiles over the weekend. The Iranians are also expected to give their formal answer to the UN next week in regards to suspending their uranium enrichment program. How do you say "No" in Persian? Because that's what they're going to say.

Finally, while this week's Roundup probably hasn't put a smile on your face, we do want to note this: The US economy is still growing, and doing so at a decent clip. It's just not growing as fast as it was earlier in the year.

Friday, August 18, 2006

 

News Bites

Here are a few short updates on the day's headlines:


 

Friday Off-Topic: August 18: Adventures in Search, and What Will The Astrologers Do Now?!

On August 9th, the New York Times published an article called "A Face Is Exposed for AOL Searcher 4417749". That article alerted the web media that AOL had accidentally released search information on almost 660,000 of its customers to a public website-- apparently a bad move by workers hoping to help academic researchers with some project or other. Since then, writers and technically fiddly types have had a field day copying, sorting, and sifting the data, trying to see what patterns emerge from the search data. What searches were most popular? How much does what you search about give away about your identity? What, in short, is America looking for?

As it turns out, mostly for dirty pictures. But we at eMvoy could have told you that: we have, after all, been in the search business for quite some time. We can also tell you this: Britney Spears is no longer the search-engine superstar she once was. We're not sure why.

Moving on from the search for... stuff, to the more ennobling search for new information about our solar system, the International Astronomical Union met in Prague this week to discuss the state of its science. One of the topics on its slate was how to define a planet, seeing as how recently there have been arguments about whether or not Pluto should be counted as one. They've come to a provisional agreement on that definition: a planet is a spherical body that does not orbit around another larger body (like our moon; that's a satellite), but has its own independent orbit around a star.

If adopted, this definition would raise the number of planets in our solar system to twelve. Pluto's "moon" Charon, a Pluto-like object technically called 2003UB313 but nicknamed "Xena", and the large asteroid Ceres (between Mars and Jupiter) would be added to the total, and there would suddenly be hundreds of other candidates available.

Forbes notes the effect this new definition (if adopted) will have on textbook publishers, model makers, and poster printers. The Guardian tries out a few new mnemonics for remembering all the names. But we want to know: what about the astrologers? How on Earth will this affect the business of casting horoscopes, if all of a sudden we've got three new planets to consider?

If you're in India and you follow Vedic Astrology, the answer is: not at all. If you're worried about your newspaper horoscope, the answer is... we're not sure. Some astrologers seem to shrug it off, saying that the new planets will have been influencing events all this time anyway, so it's just a matter of studying the planets movements in the past to understand their influences.

Personally, we think the astrologers should be hanging their heads for not having predicted this change ahead of time.
 

This Week In Blog: August 14-18

Here's what we've been reading this week in the manufacturing blogosphere:

Supplyexcellence.com: GM Drives Toward Cost Goals With New Supply Techniques. Riffing off this Reuters interview with GM's procurement chief, Supply Excellence looks at General Motors's cost-cutting crusade.

The automaker has an ambitious goal to reduce costs by 2% before the end of 2006, and is looking to do that through it supply chain even as the costs of energy and raw materials continue to climb. Their two major methods? Using cheaper foreign suppliers (with an eye towards buying more from Mexico) and increased standardization of parts across car models (a great illustration: GM makes twenty-six different types of seat frames while Toyota makes two).

Shopfloor.org: Clamoring for Workers. The NAM has been shaking the federal government tree, trying to get some manufacturing education initiatives to fall out (and they've had some success). Here, the blog highlights a must-read article in the LA Times, "Factory Shift: Manufacturers Struggle to Fill Highly Paid Jobs".

In addition to looking at statistics about the decline of manufacturing and the number of high-skilled jobs left unfilled, the article tells the story of 21-year-old Daniel McGee. A graduate from a private high school, Mr. McGee opted out of going to college after high school in favor of technical college and a two-year metalworking apprenticeship, which is paid at $14 an hour and includes health benefits. When he's done, Mr. McGee will make $58,240 a year.

This article should be sent to every high school guidance counselor in the country: it's the antidote to the "dirty, dangerous, and dull" stigma attached to manufacturing jobs. We hope there will be more stories like it in the mainstream media soon.

Speaking of metalworking, over at The Fabricator's blog, Stephanie Vaughan talks to pipe welder Tracy Rumph, who is heading to the Middle East to work for a private contractor. Vaughan looks into the types of jobs available with Middle East contractors by browsing their websites.

We'd like to add that if you want to learn about what it's like to be one of these workers, you should listen to the radio documentary "I'm From The Private Sector and I'm Here To Help", a 2004 story from WBEZ-Chicago's This American Life. It's an excellent piece of radio, describing the lives of power plant workers and security personnel. If you don't have an hour to listen, you can also download a transcript (PDF document) by clicking here.

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